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Drawings of three men who were shot and killed by posse members on Sunday, June 10, 1900. They were, from left, A.E. Burkhardt, a conductor on the Delmar Boulevard line, who died at City Hospital; Edward Thomas, a conductor on the Chouteau Avenue line, who died in an ambulance; and George Ryne, a Lee Avenue line conductor, who died at City Hospital. They were among 800 strikers who were returning from a picnic in East St. Louis and were marching west on Washington Avenue from the Eads Bridge. As they passed the posse barracks, in a building at 510 Washington, someone threw a brick at a passing streetcar. A posse member dropped his revolver, which discharged. Posse leaders said that strikers fired the next shots, after which posse members fired a volley into the marching strikers, killing three and wounding 14 others. Union leaders denied that any of their members fired any shots, and none of the posse members or sheriff's deputies was wounded. All told, 14 people were killed during the lengthy strike and boycott, which disintegrated in September. The transit workers union would not win recognition until 1918, when its members went on strike again. That strike lasted one week. (Post-Dispatch)
Caption: Drawings of three men who were shot and killed by posse members on Sunday, June 10, 1900. They were, from left, A.E. Burkhardt, a conductor on the Delmar Boulevard line, who died at City Hospital; Edward Thomas, a conductor on the Chouteau Avenue line, who died in an ambulance; and George Ryne, a Lee Avenue line conductor, who died at City Hospital. They were among 800 strikers who were returning from a picnic in East St. Louis and were marching west on Washington Avenue from the Eads Bridge. As they passed the posse barracks, in a building at 510 Washington, someone threw a brick at a passing streetcar. A posse member dropped his revolver, which discharged. Posse leaders said that strikers fired the next shots, after which posse members fired a volley into the marching strikers, killing three and wounding 14 others. Union leaders denied that any of their members fired any shots, and none of the posse members or sheriff's deputies was wounded. All told, 14 people were killed during the lengthy strike and boycott, which disintegrated in September. The transit workers union would not win recognition until 1918, when its members went on strike again. That strike lasted one week. (Post-Dispatch) Album ID: 999086 Photo ID: 29368278