Scenes from Joplin six months later
Date: 12/16/2011 Album ID: 1380861
Photos by Emily Rasinski
Pages: 1 2
Talk of angels and butterfly people have been circulating Joplin since the May 22 tornado ripped through the town.
Left, Emily Huddleston, 14, holds hands with her friend Hayley Wenner, 13, as they pray during a small group session of their youth group  at St. Paul's Methodist Church in Joplin Wednesday Dec. 7, 2011.  Huddleston in a car coming home from her brother's high school graduation when the tornado hit on May 22 and blew the car she was in a few blocks injuring her leg. Her thigh was impaled by a piece of debris that cut to her bone and required two months of recovery. After being released from the hospital she started to notice butterflies were attracted to her and often landed on her. I think its more of a sign that angels were there that night. We were being watched over, she said of appearance of butterflies. 
Emily Rasinski,  erasinski@post-dispatch.com
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Right, Eli Morgan, 5, leans against the couch with his siblings Emma, 8, Luke, 4, and Zoe Clark, 12, in their FEMA trailer in Joplin Thursday Dec. 8, 2011. The Morgan's family home was destroyed in the May 22 tornado.  All four kids and their parents Clay and Melissa Morgan were blown out of the hallway of their home where they were taking shelter from the tornado. After they landed, Eli was missing. His parents say they found him about 20 feet from the house wrapped like a burrito in a green rug. The family has no idea where the carpet came and how he got in it. 
Emily Rasinski,  erasinski@post-dispatch.com
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The mural “Butterfly Effect: Dreams Take Flight” painted on the side of the Dixie Printing building at the corner of 15th and Main Streets in Joplin was dedicated in September. The lead muralist Dave Loewenstein included art work from local children in the work. Photo taken Thursday Dec. 8, 2011. 
Emily Rasinski,  erasinski@post-dispatch.com
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Emily Huddleston, 14, was driving home from her brother's high school graduation when the tornado hit May 22 and blew the car she was in a few blocks injuring her leg. Her thigh was impaled by a piece of debris that cut to her bone and required two months of recovery. After being released from the hospital she started to notice butterflies were attracted to her and often landed on her. I think its more of a sign that angels were there that night. We were being watched over, she said of appearance of butterflies. Photo taken Wednesday Dec. 7, 2011.
Emily Rasinski,  erasinski@post-dispatch.com
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Annelise Pinjuv, 11, reaches to put the angel on top of their Christmas tree Thursday Dec. 8, 2011. Pinjuv and her stepsister Maggie McConnell, 11, participated in an art program at the Spiva Center for the Arts over the summer. Parts of one of their drawings, which included angels, was included in the mural “Butterfly Effect: Dreams Take Flight” in downtown Joplin. 
Emily Rasinski,  erasinski@post-dispatch.com
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The home at the corner of Joplin Avenue and 25th Street has been dubbed  the Volunteer Memorial House, by locals. The remaining  floors and walls are covered in messages and signatures of volunteers from all over the world who have come to Joplin. Thursday Dec. 8, 2011. 
Emily Rasinski,  erasinski@post-dispatch.com
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St Johns Regional Medical Center is visible from about a mile away on Main Street.  Prior to May 22, the view would have been blocked by homes and trees. Photo taken Thursday Dec. 8, 2011. 
Emily Rasinski,  erasinski@post-dispatch.com
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Annelise Pinjuv, 11, hangs an angel ornament on their Christmas tree Thursday Dec. 8, 2011. Pinjuv and her step sister Maggie McConnell, 11, participated in an art program at the Spiva Center for the Arts over the summer. Parts of one of their drawings, which included angels, was included in the mural. 
Emily Rasinski,  erasinski@post-dispatch.com
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Front stairs are the only remains of some homes along Main Street in Joplin. 
Emily Rasinski,  erasinski@post-dispatch.com
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The home at the corner of Joplin Avenue and 25th Street has been dubbed  the Volunteer Memorial House, by locals. The remaining  floors and walls are covered in messages and signatures of volunteers from all over the world who have come to Joplin. Thursday Dec. 8, 2011. 
Emily Rasinski,  erasinski@post-dispatch.com
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Aaron Hammock pauses to look at the tribute garden for Joplin volunteers as he takes his dog Daisy for a walk a walk in Cunningham Park in Joplin. Hammock now lives in Mt. Vernon after his home in Joplin was flooded out after the tornado. It's getting a lot better, he said of Joplin. I used to cry when I drove around here.  The memorial was built by Drury University architecture students. 
Emily Rasinski,  erasinski@post-dispatch.com
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Architecture students from Drury University built a tribute garden for Joplin volunteers in Cunningham Park. 
Emily Rasinski,  erasinski@post-dispatch.com
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Center, Clare Holdinghaus, Americorps emergency response team corps member, supervises as Anna Bettger and Jeremiah Chamberlin, plant a tree in front of a newly rebuilt home in Joplin. Bettger and Chamberlin are members of AmeriCorps’ National Civilian Community Corps. Joplin residents can apply to the city for two trees for their property. The program is run through Joplin Parks and Recreation department and facilitated by Americorps St. Louis. 
Emily Rasinski,  erasinski@post-dispatch.com
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Clay Morgan plays a video game with his son Luke, 4, in their FEMA trailer in Joplin Thursday Dec. 8, 2011. There home was destroyed in the tornado on May 22. Clay, his wife Melissa, their four kids, and his mom all live in the trailer. Clay and Melissa sleep in the main room on the mattress that they store in the hallway.  
Emily Rasinski,  erasinski@post-dispatch.com
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Left to right, AmeriCorps’ National Civilian Community Corps members Jeremiah Chamberlin, Anna Bettger and Caroline Dennisplant organize the trees they will be delivering to homes in Joplin. Joplin residents affected by the tornado can apply for two trees for their property. The program is run through Joplin Parks and Recreation department and facilitated by Americorps St. Louis. 
Emily Rasinski,  erasinski@post-dispatch.com
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A photo of the car Emily Huddleston was in when the tornado hit is glued into her scrap book.  She was sitting in the back seat on the drivers side as they drove home from her brother's high school graduation when the tornado hit May 22 and blew the car she was in a few blocks injuring her leg. Her thigh was impaled by a piece of debris that cut to her bone and required two months of recovery. 
Emily Rasinski,  erasinski@post-dispatch.com
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The cross is the only part of St. Mary's Church that is still standing. 
Emily Rasinski,  erasinski@post-dispatch.com
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St Johns Regional Medical Center is visible from about a mile away on Main Street.  Prior to May 22, the view would have been blocked by homes and trees. Photo taken Thursday Dec. 8, 2011. 
Emily Rasinski,  erasinski@post-dispatch.com
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Toppled headstones are strewn about in the cemetery behind what remains of St. Mary's Church in Joplin. 
Emily Rasinski,  erasinski@post-dispatch.com
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The mural “Butterfly Effect: Dreams Take Flight” painted on the side of the Dixie Printing building at the corner of 15th and Main Streets in Joplin was dedicated in September. The lead muralist Dave Loewenstein included art work from local children in the work. Photo taken Thursday Dec. 8, 2011. 
Emily Rasinski,  erasinski@post-dispatch.com
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