Secret Santa strikes again
Date: 12/19/2011 Album ID: 1382252
Photos by Laurie Skrivan
For the fourth year in a row, the St. Louis-area Secret Santa, a local businessman, who keeps her identity a secret, handed out $100 bills to people in need by visiting them at their homes or finding them at laundry mat or thrift stores. The tradition started more than 25 years ago with a man named Larry Stewart in Kansas City who over the years Stewart gave out $1.3 million to random people at Christmas. Before he died, he recruited a replacement to carry on the tradition. The movement has now spread to more than 25 cities.
You got me out of all my troubles, said Mary Felts of Spanish Lake, who was surprised to get a visit  from Secret Santa at her home Monday, December 19, 2011, in Spanish Lake, Mo. For the fourth year in a row, the St. Louis-area Secret Santa, a local businessman, who keeps her identity a secret, handed out $100 bills to people in need by visiting them at their homes or finding them at laundry mat or thrift stores. The tradition started more than 25 years ago with a man named Larry Stewart in Kansas City who over the years Stewart gave out $1.3 million to random people at Christmas. Before he died, he recruited a replacement to carry on the tradition. The movement has now spread to more than 25 cities.  Photo by Laurie Skrivan, lskrivan@post-dispatch.com
You got me out of all my troubles, said Mary Felts of Spanish Lake, who was surprised to get a visit from Secret Santa at her home Monday, December 19, 2011, in Spanish Lake, Mo. For the fourth year in a row, the St. Louis-area Secret Santa, a local businessman, who keeps her identity a secret, handed out $100 bills to people in need by visiting them at their homes or finding them at laundry mat or thrift stores. The tradition started more than 25 years ago with a man named Larry Stewart in Kansas City who over the years Stewart gave out $1.3 million to random people at Christmas. Before he died, he recruited a replacement to carry on the tradition. The movement has now spread to more than 25 cities.  Photo by Laurie Skrivan, lskrivan@post-dispatch.com
You got me out of all my troubles, said Mary Felts of Spanish Lake, who was surprised to get a visit  from Secret Santa at her home Monday, December 19, 2011, in Spanish Lake, Mo. For the fourth year in a row, the St. Louis-area Secret Santa, a local businessman, who keeps her identity a secret, handed out $100 bills to people in need by visiting them at their homes or finding them at laundry mat or thrift stores. The tradition started more than 25 years ago with a man named Larry Stewart in Kansas City who over the years Stewart gave out $1.3 million to random people at Christmas. Before he died, he recruited a replacement to carry on the tradition. The movement has now spread to more than 25 cities.  Photo by Laurie Skrivan, lskrivan@post-dispatch.com
You got me out of all my troubles, said Mary Felts of Spanish Lake, who was surprised to get a visit  from Secret Santa at her home Monday, December 19, 2011, in Spanish Lake, Mo. For the fourth year in a row, the St. Louis-area Secret Santa, a local businessman, who keeps her identity a secret, handed out $100 bills to people in need by visiting them at their homes or finding them at laundry mat or thrift stores. The tradition started more than 25 years ago with a man named Larry Stewart in Kansas City who over the years Stewart gave out $1.3 million to random people at Christmas. Before he died, he recruited a replacement to carry on the tradition. The movement has now spread to more than 25 cities.  Photo by Laurie Skrivan, lskrivan@post-dispatch.com
You got me out of all my troubles, said Mary Felts of Spanish Lake, who was surprised to get a visit  from Secret Santa at her home Monday, December 19, 2011, in Spanish Lake, Mo. For the fourth year in a row, the St. Louis-area Secret Santa, a local businessman, who keeps her identity a secret, handed out $100 bills to people in need by visiting them at their homes or finding them at laundry mat or thrift stores. The tradition started more than 25 years ago with a man named Larry Stewart in Kansas City who over the years Stewart gave out $1.3 million to random people at Christmas. Before he died, he recruited a replacement to carry on the tradition. The movement has now spread to more than 25 cities.  Photo by Laurie Skrivan, lskrivan@post-dispatch.com
 For the fourth year in a row, the St. Louis-area Secret Santa, a local businessman, who keeps her identity a secret, handed out $100 bills to people in need by visiting them at their homes or finding them at laundry mat or thrift stores. The tradition started more than 25 years ago with a man named Larry Stewart in Kansas City who over the years Stewart gave out $1.3 million to random people at Christmas. Before he died, he recruited a replacement to carry on the tradition. The movement has now spread to more than 25 cities.  Photo by Laurie Skrivan, lskrivan@post-dispatch.com
I am going to scream when I go back inside, said Melodie Smoots of Florissant  who  was surprised to get a visit  Secret Santa at her home Monday, December 19, 2011, in Florissant, Mo. My kids needs clothes and shoes, said a thankful Smoots. For the fourth year in a row, the St. Louis-area Secret Santa, a local businessman, who keeps her identity a secret, handed out $100 bills to people in need by visiting them at their homes or finding them at laundry mat or thrift stores. The tradition started more than 25 years ago with a man named Larry Stewart in Kansas City who over the years Stewart gave out $1.3 million to random people at Christmas. Before he died, he recruited a replacement to carry on the tradition. The movement has now spread to more than 25 cities.  Photo by Laurie Skrivan, lskrivan@post-dispatch.com
I didn't now things like this could happen, said Birdie Smith of Spanish Lake, who gets  a surprise visit  from Secret Santa at the Coin Laundry Monday, December 19, 2011, in Spanish Lake, Mo. I was down to my last ten dollars, said Brown. For the fourth year in a row, the St. Louis-area Secret Santa, a local businessman, who keeps her identity a secret, handed out $100 bills to people in need by visiting them at their homes or finding them at laundry mat or thrift stores. The tradition started more than 25 years ago with a man named Larry Stewart in Kansas City who over the years Stewart gave out $1.3 million to random people at Christmas. Before he died, he recruited a replacement to carry on the tradition. The movement has now spread to more than 25 cities.  Photo by Laurie Skrivan, lskrivan@post-dispatch.com
Thank you Jesus. This is truly a blessing, said Verdia Brown of Spanish Lake, who cried afters a surprise visit  from Secret Santa at the Coin Laundry Monday, December 19, 2011, in Spanish Lake, Mo. I was down to my last ten dollars, said Brown. For the fourth year in a row, the St. Louis-area Secret Santa, a local businessman, who keeps her identity a secret, handed out $100 bills to people in need by visiting them at their homes or finding them at laundry mat or thrift stores. The tradition started more than 25 years ago with a man named Larry Stewart in Kansas City who over the years Stewart gave out $1.3 million to random people at Christmas. Before he died, he recruited a replacement to carry on the tradition. The movement has now spread to more than 25 cities.  Photo by Laurie Skrivan, lskrivan@post-dispatch.com
Thank you Jesus. This is truly a blessing, said Verdia Brown of Spanish Lake, who cried afters a surprise visit  from Secret Santa at the Coin Laundry Monday, December 19, 2011, in Spanish Lake, Mo. I was down to my last ten dollars, said Brown. For the fourth year in a row, the St. Louis-area Secret Santa, a local businessman, who keeps her identity a secret, handed out $100 bills to people in need by visiting them at their homes or finding them at laundry mat or thrift stores. The tradition started more than 25 years ago with a man named Larry Stewart in Kansas City who over the years Stewart gave out $1.3 million to random people at Christmas. Before he died, he recruited a replacement to carry on the tradition. The movement has now spread to more than 25 cities.  Photo by Laurie Skrivan, lskrivan@post-dispatch.com